Allow watches during long rests in exchange for a longer time needed to long rest.

Stabbey
Level 8
Kickstarter Backer
6 months ago

I suggest that there be an option for taking long rests where you can take an extra 2.5 hours for the rest (total of 10.5 hours), to allow each of the four characters to take a 2.75-hour-ish watch shift and still get in their full 8 hours. Not only is this a sensible practice when traveling in hostile lands, but it will allow a character to be awake when enemies approach. They'll still have to make a perception roll to spot the danger and avoid a surprise round, but the chances are that the'll notice the enemy before they're plunging a sword into their bellies.

The drawback is that longer watches means longer time taken, which could increase the amount of travel time, and it could be a problem for more time-sensitive matters, so there could be a choice whether to speed up and risk being ambushed, or go slower but safer.

I also think that when ambushed during a long rest, it would be sensible to allow an awake character to use a bonus action to shout and awaken everyone else who is asleep, instead of using a full action to manually wake up one person. This is only for normal, long rest sleep, and would not apply to magical sleep. The people who are awoken in this manner are would still be prone and possibly (likely) surprised.

the_glimpse
Level 10
6 months ago

The actual rules for long rest already include the other stuff. No need to bump it up. 


Long Rest

A long rest is a period of extended downtime, at least 8 hours long, during which a character sleeps for at least 6 hours and performs no more than 2 hours of light activity, such as reading, talking, eating, or standing watch. If the rest is interrupted by a period of strenuous activity - at least 1 hour of walking, fighting, casting spells, or similar adventuring activity - the characters must begin the rest again to gain any benefit from it.


-Glimpse

Player333676
Level 13
6 months ago

Pathfinder: Kingmaker has such a complicated resting system (where you can assign guards, cooks etc.), and while that's a nice touch, I don't think it is necessary here and it might create too much overhead for people who just want to play the game.

Keep in mind that your travel settings (fast / medium / slow) already influence how often you get attacked.

Stabbey
Level 8
Kickstarter Backer
6 months ago

Pathfinder: Kingmaker has such a complicated resting system (where you can assign guards, cooks etc.), and while that's a nice touch, I don't think it is necessary here and it might create too much overhead for people who just want to play the game.

Keep in mind that your travel settings (fast / medium / slow) already influence how often you get attacked.

I didn't say anything about cooks, or how Pathfinder does it.

Your travel settings are themselves influenced by the amount of rations you have, and the slower you travel, the more rations you'll need (because gathering food while traveling is RNG-based and therefore unreliable). You can only buy 10 from the store for each visit to town, which is good for no more than 2.5 days.

When you inevitably get attacked at night, an enemy tends to be right next to you before you can do anything, and the only thing you can do is use your action to wake up someone, one person at a time. Why can't you shout to wake everyone up at once? Because that's not in the game.

The very first tutorial in the game happens because on the way to the inn, not even in the badlands, one of your party members was snagged up by a gang of bandits. After 3 or 4 times of being woken up with enemies all around, won't it stretch credibility that these adventurers can't grasp the idea of sleeping in shifts?


Early access is for suggestions.